Press

Fri, August 13, 2004

Musicians meet their match
Montreal Gazette

No one will be surprised to learn that the program included the Symphony No. 3 of Saint-Saëns. But it began with the premiere of Triptych (1 Logos), a 21-minute fantasy commissioned by the oratory from Julian Wachner, the organist of the Church of St Andrew and St Paul.

Starting with a fortissimo thunderclap from the orchestra, this was distinctly a work in the haut-monster-movie mode favoured by organists, regardless of’ their church vocation. There was much imperious playing from the von Beckerath instrument, which is more than a match for any orchestra.

Eventually, the idiom moved to something more sombre, including passages of chord progressions that revealed Wachner’s delight in harmony, another organist idée fixe. Might we have been allowed a few more moments of joy to lend perspective to all the gravity? Well, maybe this will come in a sequel. As it stands, this is a rugged, powerful work, and Nézet-Séguin led it with great passion and a sure sense of pace.

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Musicians meet their match:
von Beckerath organ looms large at concert
Arthur Kaptainis
Montreal Gazette, August 13, 2004

 

When Philippe Belanger assumed the post of organist at St Joseph's Oratory in 2002, it was hoped he would revive the summer recitals that had long made Wednesday evenings special for Montreal music buffs. This week he expanded on the formula by performing in tandem with the, under Yannick Nézet-Seguin, who were situated under the organ at the rear of the upper sanctuary.

No one will be surprised to learn that the program included the Symphony No. 3 of Saint-Saëns. But it began with the premiere of Triptych (1 Logos), a 21-minute fantasy commissioned by the oratory from Julian Wachner, the organist of the Church of St Andrew and St Paul.

Starting with a fortissimo thunderclap from the orchestra, this was distinctly a work in the haut-monster-movie mode favoured by organists, regardless of' their church vocation. There was much imperious playing from the von Beckerath instrument, which is more than a match for any orchestra.

Eventually, the idiom moved to something more sombre, including passages of chord progressions that revealed Wachner’s delight in harmony, another organist idée fixe. Might we have been allowed a few more moments of joy to lend perspective to all the gravity? Well, maybe this will come in a sequel. As it stands, this is a rugged, powerful work, and Nézet-Séguin led it with great passion and a sure sense of pace.

The Saint-Saëns followed with scarcely a pause. Aided by the reverberant oratory acoustics, the strings had a golden glow in the introduction and the Adagio. While some inner detail inevitably needed to be taken on faith during the more frenetic passages, the splendour of the music was strongly communicated. The big organ chords of the finale were splendid and the great hymn tune had its usual uplifting effect. What a wonderful symphony this is.

Bélanger surely thinks so, as he regaled us with an improvisation on its themes. The crowd of about 600 liked everything it heard, and with reason. Strauss’s Also Sprach Zarathustra might do nicely as follow-up next summer.

Thu, August 12, 2004

Fiesta evening at the Oratory
La Presse

Another attraction was the composition of a concerto for organ and orchestra commissioned to Julian Wachner for the Oratory’s centenary…

...the piece by Mr. Wachner (present last night and with quite an entourage) is an imposing composition. It is the first of three movements in the work, published by Schirmer, and clearly impossible to perform entirely as the first movement alone lasts 21 minutes.

The piece is presented as a great fantasy with alternating sequences by the orchestra playing alone, the organ playing alone, and the two together, in which violent and dissonant episodes are interrupted by great moments of calm, and vice versa. At certain moments, where only the organ can be heard, the instrument becomes an orchestra in itself. Rather long in parts, but a gripping end: a soft monologue by the organ, which the orchestra invades aggressively, the whole thing ending in true combat.

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Fiesta evening at the Oratory
Claude Gingras
La Presse ( Montreal), August 12, 2004

 

There was quite a party atmosphere last night in Saint Joseph's Oratory. More than 1500 people climbed up there to hear the Metropolitan Orchestra of Greater Montreal with the famous, spectacular and irresistible Organ Symphony of Saint-Saens, performed by the new resident organist, Philippe Belanger, and conducted by Yannick Nezet - Seguin. Of all our musicians, he has certainly enjoyed the most public exposure this summer.

It was thus an event in itself, it being rare to hear a symphonic orchestra play in the Oratory, and rarer still for Saint-Saens to be performed on a real church or concert organ, the usual choice being to bring an electric organ into the auditorium.

For the event, the 65-musician orchestra was seated below the gallery dominated by the colossal 78-stop Beckerath. Another attraction was the composition of a concert for organ and orchestra commissioned to Julian Wachner for the Oratory's centenary. Julian who? Indeed, it could be considered somewhat curious that the Oratory, a Catholic sanctuary, should celebrate its 100 years by commissioning the organist of a Presbyterian temple, St Andrew's and St Paul's and, in addition to this, an American organist who has only lived here a short time. I do say: "it could be considered somewhat curious". I make no comment.

Such considerations aside, the piece by Mr. Wachner (present last night and with quite an entourage) is an imposing composition. It is the first of three movements in the work, published by Schirmer, and clearly impossible to perform entirely as the first movement alone lasts 21 minutes.

The piece is presented as a great fantasy with alternating sequences by the orchestra playing alone, the organ playing alone, and the two together, in which violent and dissonant episodes are interrupted by great moments of calm, and vice versa. At certain moments, where only the organ can be heard, the instrument becomes an orchestra in itself. Rather long in parts, but a gripping end: a soft monologue by the organ, which the orchestra invades aggressively, the whole thing ending in true combat.

With no interval, the concert moves straight on to the Saint-Saens, into more familiar territory. It must be said that the reverberation in the building, even with 1500 people in the nave, did rather spoil the sound. So strong was this "echo" (as they say), especially in the faster or fortissimo passages, that the softer episodes disappeared beneath the tutti of one or two seconds earlier; sometimes, one even had the impression that the sections of the orchestra were in disaccord and were not playing together.

In spite of such conditions, Nezet-Seguin, who had given all he had in the Wachner piece, did the same in the Saint-Saens, and managed a very moving rendition of the second movement, Poco adagio (which he took a little slower than usual because of the acoustics).

Philippe Belanger, the brilliant soloist in both works, had the last say, by adding an amazing improvisation to this hour-long program with no interval. He proved to be - to use an expression dear to his predecessor Raymond Daveluy – a "virtuoso like no other".

Fri, August 6, 2004

Orchestra brings Paul Revere’s ride to children
The Boston Globe

Wachner, a onetime Boston luminary now residing in Canada, returned to narrate the Longfellow poem in his piece, and he did a good job…

The composer’s music is clear in design and fastidious in workmanship, evoking period colors (fifes and drums) and responding to the imagery in the poem—spooky water music as the moon rose over the bay where the man-o-war Somerset lay; a bassoon solo for the invading boats; a string chorale for the Old North Church graveyard. The kids even got to participate by clapping on their legs the galloping rhythm of Revere’s horse.

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Orchestra brings Paul Revere’s ride to children
Richard Dyer
Boston Globe, August 6, 2004

 

Wednesday at noon, beneath the belfry arch of the North Church Tower, Charles Ansbacher led a performance of Julian Wachner's "The Midnight Ride of Paul Revere" for an audience of children, neighborhood residents, passersby, and some lucky camera-toting tourists.

"The Midnight Ride" is the second Boston Landmarks Orchestra commission for a new work for children, following Daniel Pinkham's "Make Way For Ducklings" last year. Like "Ducklings," and Prokofiev's "Peter and the Wolf," the prototype for a children's piece with narration, Wachner's piece also serves as an introduction to the instruments of the orchestra.

By way of prelude, Ansbacher had players demonstrate their instruments and the orchestra offered a couple of brief light classics before the main event. There were also a few remarks by Charles C. Calhoun, the most recent biographer of poet Henry Wordsworth Longfellow, author of "Paul Revere's Ride" ("Listen, my children, and you shall hear / Of the midnight ride of Paul Revere"). Calhoun reminded us that the immense popularity of Longfellow's poem made Revere a national hero -- and probably preserved Old North Church; he also pointed out that the poem was written when the nation was on the brink of another conflict, so it is a poem about the Civil War as well.

Wachner, a onetime Boston luminary now residing in Canada, returned to narrate the Longfellow poem in his piece, and he did a good job, considering that his profession is not public speaking; he of all people knows when he's supposed to come in.

The composer's music is clear in design and fastidious in workmanship, evoking period colors (fifes and drums) and responding to the imagery in the poem -- spooky water music as the moon rose over the bay where the man-o-war Somerset lay; a bassoon solo for the invading boats; a string chorale for the Old North Church graveyard. The kids even got to participate by clapping on their legs the galloping rhythm of Revere's horse. At the end there is a brief reference to "God Save the King," which 56 years after Revere's ride became " America" ("My country 'tis of thee . . .").

The performance under Ansbacher's direction was lively, the children were attentive, and it was stirring to hear these words and this music beneath the belfry windows where on April 18, 1775, the lantern signal sent Revere on his ride into history.

Sat, June 19, 2004

Red House Festival’s masterful show
The Providence Journal

The Red House Festival is the brainchild of composer and conductor Julian Wachner, head of the Providence Singers. Wachner is hoping, during a time when not much else is going on, to start a festival rivaling Charleston’s Spoletto, where concerts are held in halls and churches throughout the heart of the city.

This year he is starting off slow with just four events.

The festival opened Thursday with an evening of cabaret, then moved to the more serious stuff last night with the Rorem, three-dozen gorgeous songs based on poems by Whitman, Auden, Wordsworth, Frost and a host of others.

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Sparse audience doesn't detract from premiere
The Red House festival's masterful show mirrors the title in that the audience remains unseen
Channing Gray, Arts Writer
Providence Journal, June 19, 2004

As promised, the Red House Festival delivered. Too bad Providence can't be bothered with such a class act.

A class act, at least, based on last night's showing at First Unitarian Church. Four remarkable singers gave a wonderful performance of Ned Rorem's masterful song cycle Evidence of Things Not Seen, the kind of singing you just don't hear around here very often.

And only a dozen people showed up.

Now this may be one of the problems associated with being the new kid on the block, or trying to put on a fesitval during cultural downtime in the capital city. Or maybe Rorem, probably the best American songwriter living, is too esoteric for local listeners.

But you'd think a city that's supposedly on the upswing might have shown a little more interest in an event of this ilk.

It's not too late to get behind the festival, though. More music takes place tonight at the First Unitarian Church on Benefit Street, a program that includes Schubert's beloved Trout Piano Quintet. Tomorrow winds things up with choral music by Rachmaninoff.

The Red House Festival is the brainchild of composer and conductor Julian Wachner, head of the Providence Singers. Wachner is hoping, during a time when not much else is going on, to start a festival rivaling Charleston's Spoletto, where concerts are held in halls and churches throughout the heart of the city.

This year he is starting off slow with just four events.

The festival opened Thursday with an evening of cabaret, then moved to the more serious stuff last night with the Rorem, three-dozen gorgeous songs based on poems by Whitman, Auden, Wordsworth, Frost and a host of others.

The selections were sung in different groupings, sometimes as quartets, at others trios, duets and solos.

"How do I love thee? Let me count the ways," sang mezzo Krista River in a sweet solo setting of the popular Elizabeth Barrett Browning ode. Sumner Thompson, a fine, rich baritone, did the honors in a reflective treatment of a Whitman poem that ended with the line: "That we two, content, happy in just being together, speaking little, perhaps not a word."

Alice Tillotson, the soprano with a coloratura firepower, did a lovely turn with Auden's Their Lonely Betters, just letting that heavingly last note float, as pianist Linda Osborn-Blaschke scooted up to the top of the keyboard to join her.

Tenor Jason McStoots sounded bright and clear in a meandering song assigned to Whitman's brief I Am He.

Fri, June 18, 2004

Composer leads kids on wild ‘Ride’
The Boston Globe

If you think writing classical music for kids is easy, don’t tell composer Julian Wachner. Along with such highbrow projects as an organ concerto and an opera, Wachner, 34, has been busy this spring making a kid-friendly piece for orchestra - the Boston Landmarks Orchestra, to be exact - and narrator from Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s famous poem, “Paul Revere’s Ride.’‘

The result, Wachner’s “The Midnight Ride of Paul Revere,’’ will receive its world premiere in performances on Boston Common tomorrow afternoon at 4 and 5:30 by the Boston Landmarks Orchestra. Charles Ansbacher, the orchestra’s music director, will conduct. WCRB-FM’s Ray Brown narrates.

“Children are a much harder audience than adults,’’ Wachner said. “They’ll turn off in a second.’’ And in tailoring his telling of this Boston tale to the young, he said, “The first thing I had to do was chase away any inhibitions about what my adult colleagues are going to think of this piece.’‘

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The trumpets are coming! The trumpets are coming!
Composer leads kids on a wild `Ride' with Paul Revere
T.J. Medrek
Boston Globe, June 18, 2004

 

If you think writing classical music for kids is easy, don't tell composer Julian Wachner. Along with such highbrow projects as an organ concerto and an opera, Wachner, 34, has been busy this spring making a kid-friendly piece for orchestra - the Boston Landmarks Orchestra, to be exact - and narrator from Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's famous poem, "Paul Revere's Ride.''

The result, Wachner's "The Midnight Ride of Paul Revere,'' will receive its world premiere in performances on Boston Common tomorrow afternoon at 4 and 5:30 by the Boston Landmarks Orchestra. Charles Ansbacher, the orchestra's music director, will conduct. WCRB-FM's Ray Brown narrates.

"Children are a much harder audience than adults,'' Wachner said. "They'll turn off in a second.'' And in tailoring his telling of this Boston tale to the young, he said, "The first thing I had to do was chase away any inhibitions about what my adult colleagues are going to think of this piece.''

In other words, Wachner hasn't written this 20-minute "Ride'' for, say, James Levine to spend a weekend analyzing or for a doctoral candidate to use as a dissertation subject. He's written music for kids - of all ages, of course - to enjoy.

"The audience is really meant to be the same as for Prokofiev's `Peter and the Wolf' or Benjamin Britten's `Young Person's Guide to the Orchestra,' '' Wachner said. ``It's for children to hear the story for perhaps the first time, get a sense of the orchestra and orchestration and composition - perhaps also for the first time.''

Wachner also cited Daniel Pinkham's 2003 ``Make Way for Ducklings,'' last year's delightful Landmarks commission for children, as an example of the form he hoped to emulate.

One of Wachner's biggest concerns - English teachers had better stop reading right here - was with the Longfellow poem itself. It starts with the famous lines, ``Listen my children and you shall hear/Of the midnight ride of Paul Revere . . .'' But, said Wachner, ``The poem takes a good two pages before it gets exciting. There's a description of the Mystic River and ships sailing, and the music might have sounded a little bit static. So I was careful to make some elements rhythmic and jazzy so that (the kids) wouldn't go to sleep.''

Wachner has worked equally hard at creating immediately vivid musical pictures to illustrate the action - once the action gets going.

``The music has to take the parts of the characters and the horse, as well as portray the excitement of the British Army approach and the birth of America. So there are a lot of trumpet calls, horn calls, piccolo tunes, and fifes like those of revolutionary America'' - and every town's Memorial Day parade - ``to create that sound world. It's a combination of all these wonderful American images.''

But, Wachner said there are plenty of modern musical elements at play as well - so all those experts Wachner's not writing for shouldn't be too dismissive. ``It still sounds like music from a 21st century composer,'' he reassured.

Wachner was particularly pleased to get the commission from the Landmarks Orchestra because it brings the young composer and his music back to Boston. Wachner left the city three years ago to take an appointment at Montreal's McGill University, and since then his dual career as both composer and conductor has been increasingly active.

He's got another big premiere coming up in August, an organ concerto he wrote for Montreal's Metropolitan Orchestra to play at the St. Joseph's Oratory for the famous hilltop shrine's 100th anniversary. He'll spend most of the summer finishing up an opera for McGill based on another Longfellow poem, ``Evangeline.'' He's got gigs coming up conducting the New Haven and San Diego symphony orchestras, among others.

And if you think things let up for him for this weekend's premiere, think again. After Saturday's performance, Wachner drives to Providence to play chamber music that night for the Red House Festival, a project of Wachner's Red House Opera Group.

"Then the next day I drive back to Montreal,'' he said. "I'm conducting the Charpentier Mass on original instruments for the Montreal Baroque Festival'' - at 2 p.m.

It seems there's more than one "midnight ride'' in Wachner's immediate future.

Thu, June 17, 2004

Cabaret opens, liturgy closes four-day Red House Festival
The Providence Journal

That may seem like a strange way to launch a serious chamber music festival, but then conductor Julian Wachner is hoping to reach the widest possible demographic before settling into music by Schubert, Britten and Ned Rorem.

The idea behind the event, which has been in the planning stages for a couple of years, was to put on chamber opera and other chamber compositions during a time when most classical groups are “dormant,” as Wachner put it.

Someday Wachner would like to see the Red House rival Charleston’s Spoleto Festival, where concerts are held in churches and halls throughout the heart of the city.

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Cabaret opens, liturgy closes four-day Red House Festival
Channing Gray, Arts Writer
Providence Journal, June 17, 2004

 

It's a year late and smaller than expected, but the Red House Festival has finally come to Providence. The event, four concerts spread over as many days, opens tonight with a cabaret at the Hi-Hat Nightclub.

That may seem like a strange way to launch a serious chamber music festival, but then conductor Julian Wachner is hoping to reach the widest possible demographic before settling into music by Schubert, Britten and Ned Rorem.

The idea behind the event, which has been in the planning stages for a couple of years, was to put on chamber opera and other chamber compositions during a time when most classical groups are "dormant," as Wachner put it.

Someday Wachner would like to see the Red House rival Charleston's Spoleto Festival, where concerts are held in churches and halls throughout the heart of the city.

"Most organizations go into pops mode at this time of year," said Wachner. "We want to offer something slightly different."

A red house in Aldeburgh

The event takes its name from the home Benjamin Britten shared with his life's partner, tenor Peter Pears, in the small English town of Aldeburgh. Aldeburgh was the site of an annual community festival where much of Britten's music was performed.

So don't be surprised to find the occasional Britten score pop up in Providence's Red House Festival. On Saturday night at the First Unitarian Church, the British composer's Canticle III with tenor Brad Peloquin and horn player Whit Hill shares the bill with works by Schubert.

Next season, Wachner said, he has two Britten chamber operas planned: The Prodigal Son and Noye's Fludde, a sort of modern-day miracle play written largely for children and a folksy orchestra that includes teacups.

Wachner, who teaches at McGill University in Montreal and who heads up the Providence Singers, said he has kept to a modest scale this first summer so he can work out the kinks.

"The most important thing," he said, "is to structure a plan for a bigger festival next year."

Still, he said, "we're able to do four concerts with a grand finale by the Providence Singers."

The Singers will be tackling Rachmaninoff's Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom. Wachner is just back from Ukraine, where he picked up a lot of tips on the performance of Russian Orthodox music. He has shared those with Andrew Clark, his assistant, who'll be leading the Sunday concert.

Wachner said he'd be more than pleased to see 1,000 listeners attend the four events. He tested the waters a couple of years ago in Newport with a mini-festival of Britten's music, and that sold well.

Fri, June 11, 2004

A ticket to ‘Ride’
The Boston Globe

Wachner may have left his positions here, as music director at Boston University’s Marsh Chapel and conductor of the Back Bay Chorale, but he is keeping up his New England ties. On June 19 on the Boston Common, Charles Ansbacher leads the Boston Landmarks Orchestra in the world-premiere performances of Wachner’s new work for children, “The Midnight Ride of Paul Revere” (many subsequent performances will follow during the summer throughout the region, and at some of them Wachner will deliver the narration himself). And next Thursday through June 20, the Red House Festival, curated by Wachner, presents its first season in Providence.

Wachner speaks with the precision of a program annotator and the verve of a composer in describing “The Midnight Ride”: “It is a 20-minute piece, and the model is Prokofiev’s `Peter and the Wolf.’ The idea is to tell the fun story of Paul Revere as it is narrated in Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s poem, and also to serve educational purposes by showing what it is possible for an orchestra to do, how the families of instruments connect with each other and play against each other.” This is the second Landmarks Orchestra commission for such a work; the first was Daniel Pinkham’s ” Make Way for Ducklings” last season. “I didn’t listen to it because I didn’t want to get freaked out,” Wachner confesses.

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A ticket to 'Ride'
Julian Wachner returns to NE with a new `Paul Revere'
composition and a music festival
Richard Dyer
Boston Globe, June 11, 2004

 

Julian Wachner, composer and conductor, is 34 now and lives in Canada, so the longstanding description of him as Boston's most promising and multitalented young musician no longer holds. "I'm getting gray hair," he says ruefully. He's speaking, characteristically, on the telephone from an airport, and the rush of words as usual threatens to break the sound barrier.

Wachner may have left his positions here, as music director at Boston University's Marsh Chapel and conductor of the Back Bay Chorale, but he is keeping up his New England ties. On June 19 on the Boston Common, Charles Ansbacher leads the Boston Landmarks Orchestra in the world-premiere performances of Wachner's new work for children, "The Midnight Ride of Paul Revere" (many subsequent performances will follow during the summer throughout the region, and at some of them Wachner will deliver the narration himself). And next Thursday through June 20, the Red House Festival, curated by Wachner, presents its first season in Providence.

Wachner speaks with the precision of a program annotator and the verve of a composer in describing "The Midnight Ride": "It is a 20-minute piece, and the model is Prokofiev's `Peter and the Wolf.' The idea is to tell the fun story of Paul Revere as it is narrated in Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's poem, and also to serve educational purposes by showing what it is possible for an orchestra to do, how the families of instruments connect with each other and play against each other." This is the second Landmarks Orchestra commission for such a work; the first was Daniel Pinkham's " Make Way for Ducklings" last season. "I didn't listen to it because I didn't want to get freaked out," Wachner confesses.

"What was particularly interesting to me was the way I was living in a completely different world up in Montreal while I was writing this," he says. "The Canadians are very against the war in Iraq, and there I was in my own little patriotic shell, trying to re-create some of the optimism of the original story and of Longfellow's 19th-century version of Americana."

The Red House Festival represents a long-term project of Wachner's -- the name comes from the house in Aldeburgh, England, where Benjamin Britten lived and worked. Britten is one of the composer's musical idols. "This year we are laying down the embryonic skeleton of a festival," he says. "Next year we hope to do a double bill of two of Britten's church operas."

There will be four concerts -- a cabaret night; the Rhode Island premiere of Ned Rorem's evening-length song-cycle "Evidence of Things Not Seen"; a chamber music concert in which Wachner will play a piano piece for four hands with his old friend from Boston University days, Linda Osborn-Blaschke; and a performance of Rachmaninoff's "Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom." The venues are two churches and a nightclub.

"There are two reasons for this festival," Wachner says. "One is that we want to capitalize on the renaissance of Providence. . . . The other reason is so that my friends and I can get together and play some music."

Osborn-Blaschke, who is one of the Red House planners, says, "I studied at the Britten-Pears Institute in Aldeburgh, and I was very struck by the festival there. It covered everything from Celtic folk music to new works. The performers were all musicians who were friends who wanted to work together, and it was very connected to the community -- the people who lived there didn't feel as if the festival were something removed from their lives. . . . People learned not to be afraid of music. All of us wanted to see if we could create an atmosphere like that here."

Wachner inspires intense loyalty among his friends and colleagues. Osborn-Blaschke explains, "The reason is that there is so much joy when he is making music. When he was director of the Back Bay Chorale, sometimes the last thing I wanted to do after a full day's work was to go and play a chorus rehearsal. But I had the time of my life and never wanted to leave. Working with Julian on music is a learning experience for everybody, including himself." Things are busy for Wachner in Montreal, where he teaches and conducts at McGill University. He also supervises the music in the Church of St. Andrew and St. Paul. "It has the largest organ in Canada, a big choir, and a big music program," he says. "They came after me, and they have been generous in allowing me lots of flexibility to go and do other things, so it is a little paradise."

His life in Canada parallels his life in Boston, but he hasn't had to build it himself, as he did here. "In Canada, people know me as a professional musician with a lot of experience. It is easier to make things happen, and the relationships are more straightforward. In Boston I was a student of David Hoose's, a member of the Cantata Singers under his direction, and later a professional colleague, and it was all a bit confusing."

Wachner does have some regrets about leaving: "I don't know whether it was the wrong time to go -- two months after I left the whole world changed on 9/11, and Montreal became much farther away from the US than it was before. Personally I feel I have grown as a human being and as a musician, but I do miss being able to call up some random person I knew in Boston and say, `Hey, let's go out and do something.' "

Wachner is developing a busy career as a guest conductor of regional orchestras. "That's growing and percolating, the guest conducting, and I'm a finalist for the music directorship of the Sioux City Symphony," he says.

At the same time Wachner the composer finds himself in considerable demand. He has written 10 pieces within the last year, six of them big, time-consuming orchestral works. An organ concerto will be premiered this summer, and he's busy writing a 90-minute opera based on Longfellow's poem "Evangeline."

"This poem doesn't have a good reputation anymore," he says, "but the themes of exile and of displacement in general seem quite relevant these days."

So is he a composer-conductor or a conductor-composer? Wachner thinks it's still too early to tell: "My publisher sold 20,000 copies of my pieces in 2002, which gave me an incredible feeling -- people with no personal connection to me are performing my music now, mostly the choral pieces for use in church. My string quartet is not flying off the shelves yet -- but it did get trashed in one of the record magazines!"

Sat, May 8, 2004

Fears over Levine’s health
Montreal Gazette

The McGill Chamber Orchestra’s 2004-2005 season under Boris Brott looks notably more daring than usual - if you know where to look…On February 7 there is another choral event, Haydn’s Lord Nelson Mass, along with the Canadian premiere of Julian Wachner’s Te Deum. McGill University choristers do the honours.

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Fears over Levine's health
Rumours circulate of conductor's poor concentration
Arthur Kaptainis
The Montreal Gazette
Saturday, May 08, 2004

 

Sixty going on 90? That is the inside word (and now to some extent the outside word) on James Levine, who is not only adding the Boston Symphony Orchestra to his duties next season but has extended his contract as Metropolitan Opera artistic director until 2011.

The American conductor (and gifted pianist) admits he has suffered from sciatica and tremors in his left arm and leg for a decade. The only good news is that his condition has not worsened.

At a Met performance last March of Mozart's Don Giovanni he seemed pretty much his rotund, semi-mobile, sweaty, cherubic self.

Like Luciano Pavarotti, Levine expanded to Michelin proportions early in his career. So poor to start with, such physiques show little evidence of decline.

And it is natural to expect conductors not to worsen at what they do best. Most get better as interpreters with age. Leonard Bernstein, who smoked his way to his grave, became a loftier interpreter in his shaky final years. Claudio Abbado, though much weakened, seems to be conducting his way out of a bout with stomach cancer.

As the most visible maestro of the Americas, Levine has been the subject of unrelenting rumours throughout his career. These are dismissed as fictions by former Met press secretary Johanna Fiedler in her excellent administrative history of the company, Molto Agitato.

Now, anonymous sources are talking about Levine's occasional losses of concentration on the podium. With so many anonymous sources biting at him, he might be entitled.

The conductor cannot win. By talking openly to the New York Times about his sciatica, Levine has guaranteed himself a season of high scrutiny. I suspect he will prevail.

- - -

Sixty-six-year-old Charles Dutoit is showing no signs of his age, according to Mark Swed. Commenting on his "jet black" hair two weeks ago, the Los Angeles Times critic had almost nothing but praise for the former Montreal Symphony Orchestra music director as he faced the L.A. Philharmonic.

In a piece headlined " Montreal's loss is L.A.'s gain," Swed acknowledges Dutoit's new-found reputation as a tyrant but concludes that his rehearsal methods, "whatever they might be," get results.

"In the end, there seemed to have been little to worry about. Dutoit readily achieved with the Philharmonic the tightly focused, tart sound that was his trademark in Montreal."

The only problem: he dropped his baton in Berlioz's Roman Carnival Overture. Stay tuned.

- - -

The McGill Chamber Orchestra's 2004-2005 season under Boris Brott looks notably more daring than usual - if you know where to look.

Opening night, while devoted mostly to hits by Bach, includes Pierre Mercure's Divertissement, one of a few works by that authentically gifted Quebec composer, who died in an auto accident in 1966.

Mozart and the Four Temperaments is the title of the next concert of Oct. 18, which couples Mozart's unsurprising Piano Concerto No. 14 (Sara Buechner, soloist) with the Four Temperaments of Paul Hindemith. While this is a relatively warm score by the mechanical standards of the composer, it is far from box-office candy. Nor is Joaquin Turina's seldom-encountered Symphonic Rhapsody Op. 66.

Next comes Handel's inevitable Messiah on Nov. 22, billed the first of the season (which is to say, too early). I remember trying to convince the late Lotte Brott, who managed the orchestra with legendary acumen, to program Handel's Judas Maccabaeus as an interesting alternative (and Hannukah celebration). No dice.

On February 7 there is another choral event, Haydn's Lord Nelson Mass, along with the Canadian premiere of Julian Wachner's Te Deum. McGill University choristers do the honours. This might be a good time to remind readers that the "McGill" moniker used by the orchestra for almost 60 years denotes no administrative connection to the university.

Pianist Anton Kuerti returns on April 18 to play Beethoven's Piano Concerto No. 2 in a program including Beethoven's Symphony No. 8. There is some modern spice in this program as well, in the form of Celebrations, by the late Andre Prevost. The May 9, 2005, program that is not only strictly from the 20th century but a test of the orchestra's mettle: Stravinsky's Apollon Musagete, Ginastera's Concerto for Strings and Bartok's Divertimento. This looks like a repudiation of the old star system the orchestra cultivated for years.

The season finale of May 30, 2005, includes the Suite Hebraique No. 1 of the late Canadian Srul Irving Glick and Schubert's Symphony No. 5. Martin Beaver, whose Beethoven performance this season went unnoticed because of an outbreak of Nagano news, will be heard in Prokofiev's Violin Concerto No. 1.

Canadian content will surely rise on March 14 when the orchestra celebrates the 90th birthday of its founder, Alexander Brott, who continues to make cameo appearances in McGill Chamber Orchestra concerts.

Everything is TBA, including a surprise soloist. Might we expect some 21st-century music from this indefatigable composer/conductor?

Concerts other than Messiah and the birthday celebration are in Pollack Hall. Call (514) 487-5190 for subscription information.

Wed, April 28, 2004

Finalists chosen for symphony conductor/music director
Sioux City Journal

On Oct. 16, Julian Wachner will take the podium. In addition to serving as co-director of the Young Artist’s Composition Program at the Boston University Tanglewood Institute, Wachner is associate professor of music at McGill University, artistic director of the Providence Singers and music director of the Church of St. Andrew/St. Paul, Montreal. He also will conduct a Classical Kids family concert Oct. 17 in Sioux City.

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Finalists chosen for symphony conductor/music director
Staff writer
Sioux City Journal
April 28, 2004

 

The eight finalists for the position of conductor and music director of the Sioux City Symphony Orchestra were annouced Tuesday.

The eight were selected from the more than 115 applications received from conductors from across the country and around the world.

"Having so many talented candidates is truly an exciting and wonderful problem to have," said David Krogh, Symphony Board president. "We know, and people in Siouxland know, what a fantastic orchestra we have here, so it's gratifying to see the number and quality of conductors from all over the world who are eager to come to Sioux City as our next music director."

Each of the finalists will serve as guest conductor of one of the Symphony's eight concerts during the 2004-05 season. Each candidate will spend approximately one week in Sioux City rehearsing with the Symphony in preparation for a concert. During the week, the candidates also will be interviewed by the search committee, meet with board members at large, attend a private reception for community members and meet with Symphony staff and players.

"A music director search is a fascinating time, both for the orchestra and the audience," said Doug Gerhart, the Symphony's executive director. "There is no other time in the life of an orchestra that one can see and hear the immense impact conductors have on the sound of an orchestra."

The first candidate to demonstrate her impact on the orchestra will be Zian Zhang at the season's opening concert Sept. 11. Zhang is a member of the New York Philharmonic conducting staff and a first prize winner of the Maazel/Vilar International Conductor's Competition. A native of Dandon, China, Zhang is the music director of the Concert Orchestra and a faculty member at the College-Conservatory of Music at the University of Cincinnati.

On Oct. 16, Julian Wachner will take the podium. In addition to serving as co-director of the Young Artist's Composition Program at the Boston University Tanglewood Institute, Wachner is associate professor of music at McGill University, artistic director of the Providence Singers and music director of the Church of St. Andrew/St. Paul, Montreal. He also will conduct a Classical Kids family concert Oct. 17 in Sioux City.

Mark Gibson, who heads the conducting program at the College-Conservatory of Music at the University of Cincinnati will conduct the Symphony's Nov. 13 concert. Trained in the United States with Gustav Meier, Seiji Ozawa and Leonard Bernstein, Gibson maintains a worldwide conducting career. He is in his fourth year as artistic director of the Music Festival of Lucca, Italy.

Conductor David Searle will work with the Symphony and the Siouxland Civic Dance Association for two performances of "The Nutcracker" Dec. 4 and 5. Currently, he is chief conductor of the Helsinki University Symphony Orchestra in Finland. He is a graduate of the New England Conservatory of Music, Northwestern University and the Sibelius Academy in Helsinki where he earned his diploma in conducting with highest honors.

Conductor Lawrence Loh will direct the Symphony's performance of Handel's "Messiah" Dec. 18. He currently serves as associate conductor of the Dallas Symphony Orchestra and former was associate conductor of the Colorado Symphony Orchestra.

In early March, the Symphony will introduce the Inaugural Iowa Piano Competition featuring 12 world-class pianists competing for $14,000 in prize money. The three finalists in the competition will work with candidate Edward Polochick when they perform during the Symphony's March 5 concert. Polochick also will conduct the March 6 Classical Kids family concert.

Polochick, founder and artistic director of Concert Artists of Baltimore, is completing his sixth season as music director of the Lincoln Symphony Orchestra. He also is associate conductor of the Peabody Orchestras, director of Choral Ensembles and opera conductor at the Peabody Conservatory of Music.

Leslie B. Dunner will direct the Symphony's April 9 concert, a school-day educational concert and the Classical Kids family concert on April 10. Dunner recently was appointed music director and conductor of the Joffrey Ballet of Chicago. He formerly was the music director of the Annapolis Symphony Orchestra, assistant conductor with the New York Philharmonic and an assistant condcutor with the Detroit Symphony Orchestra.

Conductor Timothy Hankewich will close out the 2004-2005 season by bringing his baton to a performance of Beethoven's Ninth Symphony. Currently, Hankewich is in his fifth year at the Kansas City Symphony and his first as resident conductor. His awards include the prestigious Aspen Conducting Award.

The entire community will be invited to participate in the selection of the next conductor. Evaluation forms will be distributed at each concert to obtain audience feedback, and the public will be invited to cast their vote on the Symphony's Web site throughout the 2004-2005 season.

Tickets for the 2004-2005 season are on sale now through the Symphony box office at (712) 277-2111 or on line at http://www.siouxcitysymphony.org

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Fri, April 23, 2004

Review: Rilke Songs
Choral Journal

Wachner’s settings are text driven and completely immersed in the descriptive color of the native tongue in which the Rilke poems are set. Thick and dense textures give way to unison and simple four-part homophony. Wide tessituri are explored but not exploited. Bi-tonality permeates much of his writing style. Although his writing can seem dissonant, it is imbued with a soft sense of tonal color that embraces Rilke’s fascination with the flow of the movement of animals and more important, the deeper meanings of the text…

...Rilke Songs is a technically and vocally demanding cycle that is appropriate for the advanced collegiate ensemble. Performed in its entirety, or two or three as a set, they are an outstanding contribution to choral literature.

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Review: Rilke Songs
Alan Raines, Georgia State University
Choral Journal Vol. 44 Nr. 9 (April 2004)

Full text follows:
Rilke Songs
Julian Wachner
SATB
ECS Publishing (published separately)

1. Die Gazelle, #5889
2. Der Panther, #5890
3. Die Flamingos, #5891

Rilke said, "Verses are not as people imagine, simply feelings... they are experiences. For the sake of a single verse, one must see many cities, men and things, one must know the animals, one must feel how the birds fly and know the gesture with which little flowers open in the morning." The wealth of visual imagery in Rilke's writing is without question. His poetry serves composers with such textual significance that, when wedded with outstanding music, can transcend the mundane and propel the listener to new realms.

Julian Wachner, (b. 1969) has taken six of Rilke's poems, set them for SATB chorus with divisi and given birth to a musical product that is well worth noting. Die Gazelle, Der Panther, Die Flamingos, Der Schwan, Schwartze Katze and Das Einhorn are set in their native German with English translations available in the forward of the octavo. Although these settings are cyclically composed, two or three can be extracted and performed as a set. This review will be of the first three.

Wachner's settings are text driven and completely immersed in the descriptive color of the native tongue in which the Rilke poems are set. Thick and dense textures give way to unison and simple four-part homophony. Wide tessituri are explored but not exploited. Bi-tonality permeates much of his writing style. Although his writing can seem dissonant, it is imbued with a soft sense of tonal color that embraces Rilke's fascination with the flow of the movement of animals and more important, the deeper meanings of the text.

Die Gazelle [The Gazelle] is a through-composed piece reminiscent in style to the music of Whitacre and Lauridsen with performance indications of "expansive and full." The final section of the piece is an analogy between a gazelle standing in rapt attention and a woman bathing in a forest lake. Julian Wachner does a masterful job of setting the text with the use of strict canon at the unison in three of the voices. The other voice is at the fourth. The result is an amazing picture of peaceful stillness as the tempo indication of quarter note equals forty-four and "quasi misterioso, meno mosso" suggests.

Der Panther [The Panther] is centered in G minor and never ventures far from it. Tessitura and dynamic ranges are very minimal with a tempo indication of a quarter note equals 56 and "triste." It leaves one with the feeling of entrapment as the animal endlessly paces back and forth behind the iron bars of its cage.

Die Flamingos [The Flamingos] is set for double chorus and is in ABA form. Chorus II begins with the sopranos on a rhythmic and melodic pattern of quick sixteenth notes in which the text is repeated over and over. The basses enter with the same text and rhythm but now with an inverted melody. Altos enter as the sopranos did but on a different pitch and the tenors enter as did the basses. The key center stays in F major. All entrances are pianissimo and the resultant cacophony is impressive. Chorus I proclaims the remaining poem in long held notes above the "noise." The B section is mostly homophonic and text driven, which then begs for the A section to return to the shrieks of sound and flashes of pink feathers!

Julian Wachner's Rilke Songs is a technically and vocally demanding cycle that is appropriate for the advanced collegiate ensemble. Performed in its entirety, or two or three as a set, they are an outstanding contribution to choral literature.

Fri, April 23, 2004

Review: Wachner, Rilke Songs
Spectrum-Music.com

Rilke Songs reviewed by staff critic

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REVIEW FROM SPECTRUM-MUSIC.COM

Rilke Songs, Julian Wachner, German text, ECS, Die Gazelle, 5889, Der Panther, 5890, Die Flamingos, 5891, Der Schwan, 5892, Schwartze Katze, 5893, Das Einhorn, 5894, SATB (divisi) a cappella. Commissioned by the Newton Choral Society, Newton, MA, David Carrier, Conductor, for their 25th anniversary, these are very ambitious pieces but extremely original and filled with wonderful compositional moments. Translated from the German by Karin Grundler-Whitacre, all of the editions contain background on the award-winning composer. The entire set of six pieces, each published separately, requires an accomplished choir to guarantee a successful performance. The text painting of these pieces about animals and fowl is brilliantly conceived. Changing meters, challenging rhythms, intervals, and harmonies are all elements of Wachner's compositional style. Difficulty rating 4-5. $1.65 - $2.40

 

Sat, April 17, 2004

Spotlight on Living Composers
Charleston.net

Sunday, March 14, was bright and sunny with a chill in the air, ideal for a 4 p.m. concert by the CSO at the Cathedral of St. Luke and St. Paul. The church was packed for a program devoted to composers not only living but more or less local. The music all required choral singing, so the Charleston Symphony Orchestra Chamber Singers and the College of Charleston Concert Choir were on hand, too. Robert Taylor conducted. The composers were Edward Hart, David Maves and Trevor Weston (all of the college faculty), Richard Moryl (who lives here), Eric Whitacre and Julian Wachner (increasingly visible as both conductor and composer in several past Spoletos)...

Wachner’s “Regina Coeli” is a big piece, rowdy but effective…it made an entertaining finale.

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SPOTLIGHT ON LIVING COMPOSERS
from Charleston.net

Sunday, March 14, was bright and sunny with a chill in the air, ideal for a 4 p.m. concert by the CSO at the Cathedral of St. Luke and St. Paul. The church was packed for a program devoted to composers not only living but more or less local. The music all required choral singing, so the Charleston Symphony Orchestra Chamber Singers and the College of Charleston Concert Choir were on hand, too. Robert Taylor conducted. The composers were Edward Hart, David Maves and Trevor Weston (all of the college faculty), Richard Moryl (who lives here), Eric Whitacre and Julian Wachner (increasingly visible as both conductor and composer in several past Spoletos).

With one exception, the printed programs gave no dates of the compositions, an important fact in the case of living composers, so it was impossible to know whether the chosen works were new or early efforts. As the afternoon went on, the music seemed to me surprisingly introspective and distinctly melancholy. I couldn't help wondering how much the present dangers and tragedies of the world influenced these pieces, which sounded to me anchored in some past and more pleasant era.

Hart's "Salvation" proved very melodic in a comfortably conservative way, with dramatic sweep, a sure command of the orchestra and a full-throated climax for the chorus. Whitacre's "Five Hebrew Love Songs" sparkled with color and dance rhythms but was essentially thoughtful and lyrical in feel.

Maves' "God's Grandeur" summoned surprising energy and harsh phrases to support a pantheistic poem by Gerard Manley Hopkins. In a program note, Mr. Maves said the piece dates from 1963 and won him his first big success, a Ford Foundation prize. The work struck me immediately as sounding as if inspired by Jan·cek's music, with those distinctive short phrases, barking brass and slashing string figures. I asked Mr. Maves at the intermission if he knew anything about Jan·cek back in 1963, and he said, "Of course. His music made me want to become a composer." I don't think I'd recommend the eccentric Jan·cek as a model for young composers, but in Mr. Maves' case, it seems to have paid off. It certainly had exciting results in "God's Grandeur."

Moryl's "Illuminations" reminded me of those sonic mosaics people like Messiaen and Ligeti used to write. With its ominous low notes rumbling at the subsonic level, chattering chorus and variously ominous interjections from percussion, it had a weird, spacey fascination and easily held the attention during its too-brief length.

In Weston's "Three Moods," the music was, for the most part, gently ruminative, with delicate response to the words of Carol Ann Davis and Garrett Doherty, poets who edit a literary magazine called Crazyhorse. I hadn't come across these particular poets before, but their "Three Moods" have a moist, slightly other-world quality that reminded me of Sara Teasdale. It proved a beautiful match for words and the gentle phrases in which Mr. Weston had wrapped them.

Wachner's "Regina Coeli" is a big piece, rowdy but effective, though its effectiveness is all too clearly due to Poulenc's "Gloria" and the more strident "religious" music of Leonard Bernstein. I sensed the piece contained more showbiz flair than any particular religious passion. Still, it made an entertaining finale. I was impressed with singer Margaret Kelly Cook, whose soprano has a great deal of impact and a throat full of high C's unfazed by the loudest pages concocted by Mr. Wachner.

Oscar Wilde's "The Importance of Being Earnest" showed up at the Dock Street Theatre, produced by Charleston Stage and directed by Marybeth Clark. Four years ago, when everyone was trying to decide what humanity had accomplished in the expiring millennium, The New York Times declared "Earnest ..." the best comedy of the last thousand years. I'll go along with that extravagant judgment, not because I think it true (though I do), but because I can't think of anything to challenge it.

"The Importance of Being Earnest" is witty beyond wit, filled with inside jokes, social comment and sharp criticism of people and their vanities. The story itself is a joke at theatrical conventions, full of disappearances, mistaken identities and impossible coincidences. It involves three couples of different ages and attitudes, with a formidable and funny central figure to keep the action swirling. This is precisely the same comedic setup as Mozart's great comedy, "Cosi Fan Tutte," and it is Wilde's genius that his "Earnest ..." is Mozartian in its joy, brilliance and balance. It lacks Mozart's depth and humanity, but it dazzles so brightly that you don't stop to think that it's all basically heartless.

Ms. Clark's production was true to the style and spirit of Wilde, and she had taught her cast to speak a convincingly fey form of British. Matt Leisy was a superbly smug Algernon, Chris Edwards a distraughtly dignified Mr. Worthing. Lindsey Lamb's Cecily was adorably shrewd, and Tiffany Parker's Gwendolyn all ice and sarcasm. Samille Basler made a lovably flustered Miss Prism, and John Edwards was a model of rectitude as Rev. Chasuble. Mention also must be made of Ben Ryan's smirking, overbearing butler and, later on, Drew Archer's old and deaf version of a different servant.

Michael Locklair, in elegantly fashionable drag, played Lady Bracknell. It has become something of a tradition to cast this role with a man, since it is nearly impossible to find a female actress able to erase memories of the great Edith Evans, who recorded the play for Angel Records and played the role in a film version. Dame Edith's voice and delivery remain incomparable, and I still recall how her thunderous "IN A HANDBAG???" used to bounce the needle out of the groove of my record player. Mr. Locklair went for elegance, kept his voice under control and refused to camp it up. He didn't make me forget Dame Edith, but he kept me from thinking about her when he was on stage.

Over at Footlight Players, "Blood Brothers" proved an up-and-down experience. The musical, by Willy Russell, tells of two babies separated at birth. They grow up in the same town while their birth mother and foster mother try to keep them apart. As children they meet anyway and swear eternal "blood brotherhood." Eventually they fall in love with the same girl, and one brother shoots his twin, and then the police shoot him.

It's a strong story thinned by weak music. Nonetheless, "Blood Brothers" has had successful runs in London, New York and elsewhere. I thought it mawkish and derivative, as if Evita had moved in with the Fantasticks. Mr. Russell's score noodles along in a semi-soft kind of rock, never pulling itself together in a tune worth remembering. The first act was downright embarrassing, thanks to amateurish choreography and limp direction and by amplification (in this tiny space!) that distorted voices and balances. Things picked up considerably in the second half, though, and the last 40 minutes generated real dramatic heat.

Among the large cast, Jamie Westberry stood out for passionate and skilled acting of the more troubled of the two brothers, and he was well-matched by Evan Linder as the more fortunate brother. Rheney Tuten impressed as the conniving foster mother, her progression from sweetness to psychosis subtly and effectively managed. Sharon Graci was the tormented birth mother, acting with her familiar skill but plagued by a cold that turned her voice into an interesting croak (she sounded like Bette Davis). Maybe this was the reason her words were incomprehensible when she raised her voice in "song," but maybe not. In any case, if Ms. Graci intends to incorporate singing into her arsenal of skills, she had better work on her singing diction. There are books and classes for just this sort of defect.

There was nothing defective in the sounds produced by the Czech Philharmonic at the Gaillard on March 15. It's a great orchestra, 107 master musicians conducted by the Russian-born Andrey Boreyko. The program had the Comedians' Dance from Smetana's "The Bartered Bride," plus Dvorak's violin concerto (powerfully played by Akiko Suwanai) and the " New World" symphony. In all works there was rich, glossy sound and that ineffable authority that comes when great musicians apply themselves to their own native music. Too bad there were so many empty seats.

The second movement of the " New World" symphony turned up a week later in a different version. Kathleen Battle, ex-diva of the Met, sang it on her concert for the Charleston Concert Association (which also produced the Czech Philharmonic). Ms. Battle was a great singer in her opera days, with a high, pliant soprano of small size but great beauty. For whatever reasons, she grew into an unbearably difficult diva noted for her rudeness to colleagues. In 1994, while rehearsing at the Met for an upcoming "Daughter of the Regiment," she abruptly was fired, the news sparking loud and enthusiastic applause from her colleagues. Since then, she has stuck to concerts and recordings.

At the Gaillard, she proved a handsome woman of 56, with warmth and great charm, and her relations with a quintet of onstage musicians appeared to be of the best. She used a microphone, holding it mostly at arm's length, and sounded much as she always has. It's a very high voice, soft-textured and easily produced, and she can do pretty much anything she wants with it. Her diction is a marvel of clarity, and her words came through clearly no matter the range in use. She was at her best in songs not requiring vocal strength, and most of the songs last Tuesday night sat just right for her.

The Gaillard program contained songs, hymns and a number of Spanish and Brazilian works. All were delivered with elaborate and seemingly spontaneous jazz freedom. Her musicians included Cyrus Chestnut (piano), James Carter (brass), Christian McBride (bass), Romero Lubambo (guitar) and Cyro Baptista (percussion). Incidentally, those hoping to bone up on Spoleto's upcoming "Ariadne auf Naxos" should get the DVD issue of a Met production from 1989, starring Jessye Norman and with Miss Battle in brilliant form.

The Charleston Symphony Orchestra on March 20 pulled in a full house. There were unusually large numbers of young listeners, which one college professor said was due to a recent effort by music appreciation classes. By the look of it, every youngster seemed to be having a good time. Let's hope those M.A. classes continue. The program was all-Beethoven ("Leonore" No. 2 overture, the "Emperor" Concerto and the Fifth Symphony). Despite the large audience, I thought the orchestra in tepid form. The soloist, the lavishly named German pianist Victor Emanuel von Dijon von Monteton, also disappointed, unable to summon the grandeur of this noble concerto, sprinkling the score with piddling mistakes and swooning over the phrases as if the piece were by Chopin. In fairness to Herr E.V.D.V.M., it should be noted that the piano sounded old, tired and tinny. Is this the best instrument this city can offer visiting artists?

Sat, April 17, 2004

Review: Wachner, Ave Dulcissima Maria
Spectrum-Music.com

Review of Ave Dulcissima Maria by staff critic

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REVIEW FROM SPECTRUM-MUSIC.COM

Ave Dulcissima Maria by Julian Wachner, Latin text, ECS, 5811, SATB a cappella. This wonderful setting of this famous Latin text is quite elegant and profound in its harmonic and rhythmic expression. The anthem opens with shimmering/ harmonies whose text greets the virgin Mary. The musical gesture quickly changes to more powerful harmonies that carefully express the text. In general, the rhythms and harmonies become more complex with each phase shape. After the complexity intensifies, each section concludes in organum-like harmonic style reminiscent of the late medieval period. Ave, sulcissima Maria is the fourth movement of a larger work entitled Regina Coeli. The 15 minute work (ECS 5832) has a piano reduction and can be performed with either small or large orchestra. Difficulty rating 3-4. $1.65

 

Mon, March 15, 2004

Audience experiences striking musical moments
Charleston Post and Courier

Julian Wachner’s “Regina Coeli” uses Latin texts extolling the virtues of the Virgin Mary in a strikingly modern way as a rather dour soprano solo by Margaret Kelly Cook became progressively more embellished until it became a soaring piece of coloratura, ending the work on a high note of theatrical triumph.

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Audience experiences striking musical moments
Jeff Johnson
Post and Courier Reviewer, South Carolina

March 15, 2004

 

At times Sunday afternoon, conductor Robert Taylor had musicians deployed throughout the Cathedral Church of Saint Luke and Saint Paul for a concert filled with striking musical moments.

The church was packed for "Music With Our Friends," a joint presentation of the Charleston Symphony Orchestra, the CSO Chamber Singers and the College of Charleston Concert Choir.

"Our Friends" were the composers Edward Hart, David Maves, Eric Whitacre, Richard Moryl, Trevor Weston and Julian Wachner, and poets Carol Ann Davis, Garrett Doherty, Beth Webb Hart and Hila Plitmann, whose works were performed and who are vital parts of the Charleston musical scene and friends of Taylor.

Edward Hart musically molded several religious poems by his wife into an Easter piece, "Salvation," which begins in a somber, elegiac mood depicting a wasteland bound in death before moving through sections of consolation to triumphant heavenly rebirth. Hart's great gift at setting the vocal line was brought out by the excellent diction of the combined chorus.

Using five Hebrew Love Songs by his wife in English translation, Whitacre celebrates a vastly more personal love in a variety of instrumental moods. Trevor Weston's "Three Moods" gives powerful musical form to introspective poems by Davis and Doherty.

Julian Wachner's "Regina Coeli" uses Latin texts extolling the virtues of the Virgin Mary in a strikingly modern way as a rather dour soprano solo by Margaret Kelly Cook became progressively more embellished until it became a soaring piece of coloratura, ending the work on a high note of theatrical triumph.

Moryl is attracted by the mysterious majesty of medieval texts, and his "Illuminations" is compelling in evoking the atmosphere of the object with nonverbal soprano solo, voices, six string basses and chamber orchestra.

Only the orchestra is on stage, with the rest of the performers positioned around the audience to envelope them in the texture of the music. The vocal line, sung by Suzanne Fleming-Atwood, is striking, and "Illuminations" is filled with eloquent emotion.

David Maves' setting of Gerard Manley Hopkins' "God's Grandeur" pays attention to the eloquent phrasing of the poet and his language, which the chorus handled with precision. Taylor stressed the power of Maves music so the impact seemed more like the last judgment than Hopkins' pastoral sunrise.

Taylor controlled the long concert beautifully, carefully bringing out the individual nature of each piece. All of the composers and poets at the concert seemed pleased with his and his musician's hard work.

Sat, March 13, 2004

Symphony, Julian Wachner, Master Chorale
SanDiego.com

The San Diego Symphony has its new music director - Jahja Ling - but it seems to be cultivating a most welcome long-term relationship with young Julian Wachner, who has, in the course of four annual “Messiahs” and other bits, become sort of a choral specialist here.

Great idea, say I. Wachner has a rapport with the big chorale works that is evident even to the audience. And the San Diego Master Chorale - safe now after years of tribulations with the excellent Martin Wright as resident boss - fairly purrs when he’s around.

The latest program is built upon the Mozart Requiem in D minor, which was delivered with notable chorale warmth, a rare balance among the four soloists, a stirring trombone solo by veteran George Johnston and all the drama, mystery and passion for which this piece is so respected.

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Symphony, Julian Wachner, Master Chorale
Welton Jones
The Arts - sandiego.com, March 13, 2004

 

The San Diego Symphony has its new music director - Jahja Ling - but it seems to be cultivating a most welcome long-term relationship with young Julian Wachner, who has, in the course of four annual "Messiahs" and other bits, become sort of a choral specialist here.

Great idea, say I. Wachner has a rapport with the big chorale works that is evident even to the audience. And the San Diego Master Chorale - safe now after years of tribulations with the excellent Martin Wright as resident boss - fairly purrs when he's around.

The latest program is built upon the Mozart Requiem in D minor, which was delivered with notable chorale warmth, a rare balance among the four soloists, a stirring trombone solo by veteran George Johnston and all the drama, mystery and passion for which this piece is so respected.

Before intermission, amazingly enough, two works by living composers - both present to take their bow - were given the Wachner treatment, to invigorating effect. One, the "Regina Coeli" for soprano orchestra and chorus, he even wrote himself.

And it's not bad at all, influenced by Leonard Bernstein and rich with surprises, such as the first entrance of the chorus. The engaging soprano Joanna Mongiardo managed the tricky passages of unison ornamentation with the orchestra as a highlight of a most delightful performance, full of simmer and hopefully a source of satisfaction to its creator.

Carlyle Sharpe's "Proud Music of the Storm," a Walt Whitman poem set for four soloists, orchestra and chorus, suffered a bit from being sandwiched between Wachner and Mozart. Though melodious and cleanly orchestrated, the work must be shoved through barren patches by momentum from such inspired sections as a very nice a capella section and some neatly set solos, in which mezzo-soprano Phyllis Pancella earned notice for her diction and bass Curtis Streetman for his rich middle register.

These three, with tenor Scott Wyatt, were the balanced quartet that so suited the Mozart's sublime moments. More from Wachner. (What else has he written?) And more from the Master Chorale, which is sounding its best in years.

Thu, March 11, 2004

On the Wachner Watch
San Diego Union-Tribune

For Julian Wachner, it’s not enough to be a conductor admired for his skill, insight and exciting podium style. Wachner is also a composer with an ever-growing list of works for orchestra, voices or chamber ensembles. “Being a conductor and a composer – that’s definitely the kind of career I want. And I’m doing it, which is great,” says the 34-year-old associate professor of music at Montreal’s McGill University.

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On the Wachner Watch
The composer has 'the kind of career I want' – and that includes stops in San Diego to conduct his own music
Valerie Scher
San Diego Union-Tribune
March 11, 2004

 

For Julian Wachner, it's not enough to be a conductor admired for his skill, insight and exciting podium style. Wachner is also a composer with an ever-growing list of works for orchestra, voices or chamber ensembles. "Being a conductor and a composer – that's definitely the kind of career I want. And I'm doing it, which is great," says the 34-year-old associate professor of music at Montreal's McGill University.

His versatility will be apparent at the San Diego Symphony's upcoming concerts, slated for tonight at the California Center for the Arts, Escondido and tomorrow through Sunday at downtown's Copley Symphony Hall.

Wachner – known locally for leading the orchestra's annual performances of Handel's "Messiah" – will make his first appearances on the Jacobs' Masterworks Series. He'll lead the orchestra, San Diego Master Chorale and vocal soloists in Mozart's Requiem, one of classical music's profound masterworks. Also on the program is Carlyle Sharpe's "Proud Music of the Storm," a choral piece – set to words by Walt Whitman – that Wachner conducted at its 2001 premiere in Rhode Island.

Then there's "Regina Coeli," Wachner's 16-minute work from 1999, which is scored for soprano, chorus and orchestra. While the text is in Latin, the style isn't lofty. It's fun – a piece very influenced by Leonard Bernstein," says Wachner, who compares "Regina Coeli's" most effusive passages to the giddy, coloratura aria "Glitter and Be Gay" in Bernstein's "Candide." "It's one of my most accessible pieces."

Born in Hollywood to a musical family, Wachner is a former wunderkind who appreciates music both old and new. Equipped with a doctorate from Boston University and considerable experience leading choral groups, he combines scholarship with a refreshing lack of pretension.

He says that conducting Mozart's celebrated Requiem is like "walking into an icon. You feel unworthy. But I try to think of the music in dramatic stage terms. Mozart knew how drama worked, how pacing worked. Did that influence the Requiem? Yes, absolutely."

Wachner is also an expert in Handel's "Messiah." He made his San Diego Symphony debut in 2001, leading the oratorio that's a holiday staple. This December, he'll return for his fourth consecutive year of San Diego area "Messiah" performances.

His approach is bold, even irreverent. His tempos are fast, but Wachner defends his need for speed. "The 'Messiah' has a reputation for being this stodgy, lugubrious piece," he says, noting that Victorian performances favored slow and stately pacing. "I want it to sound fresh again. One way to do that is to make it more vibrant in terms of the tempos." Vitality is crucial to him, whether the music is by Handel, Mozart or Wachner.

"I often treat choral works as if they are operatic works," explains the conductor-composer-teacher, who's happy to have a hyphenated career. "All music has dramatic energy. And that's what I want to bring out."

Thu, January 22, 2004

‘Paul Revere’ gets Landmarks treatment
The Boston Herald

Boston’s favorite revolutionary silversmith will ride again when the Boston Landmarks Orchestra presents the world premiere of ``The Midnight Ride of Paul Revere’’ on Boston Common in June…The composer is Julian Wachner, an associate professor of music at Montreal’s McGill University who was formerly based in Boston.

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'Paul Revere' gets Landmarks treatment
T.J. Medrek
Boston Herald
Thursday, January 22, 2004

 

Boston's favorite revolutionary silversmith will ride again when the Boston Landmarks Orchestra presents the world premiere of ``The Midnight Ride of Paul Revere'' on Boston Common in June. The work for narrator and orchestra, based on Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's famous poem ``Paul Revere's Ride,'' was commissioned by the orchestra for its free children's concert series. The composer is Julian Wachner, an associate professor of music at Montreal's McGill University who was formerly based in Boston. Longfellow's text is adapted by local singer/songwriter Joe Pernice. Landmarks Music Director Charles Ansbacher will conduct the premiere as well as other free performances around eastern Massachusetts. Last year, Landmarks premiered Daniel Pinkham's ``Make Way for Ducklings,'' to wide acclaim

Fri, December 19, 2003

‘Messiah’ performed with flair, drama
The Providence Journal

Every now and then, though, someone decides to dust off the Mozart version of Messiah.  The Providence Singers, perhaps the classiest vocal group around, did just that last night at Veterans Memorial Auditorium, with a fine-sounding New Haven Symphony backing them up…At its core, though, the Mozart version is still Messiah in all its glory, still a dramatic retelling of the Bibical account of the life, death and resurrection of Jesus.

And with the Singer’s Julian Wachner on the podium, it was a story told with great flair and drama, with brisk tempos and precious few pauses between arias and choruses.

This was especially true after intermission, when the Singers tore through a string of choral numbers at a blistering pace, proving that they are one very disciplined ensemble. Entrances were crisp, textures clear, and the overall sound buoyant and unforced.

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'Messiah' performed with flair, drama

by Channing Gray
Providence Journal, Friday, December 19, 2003

 

Not even Mozart could spoil a great piece of music like Messiah.

Not that he tried. Actually, Mozart arranged Handel's beloved oratorio to the tastes of his time. No great sin back then, but it's not the kind of kind of tinkering we tend to tolerate these days.

Every now and then, though, someone decides to dust off the Mozart version of Messiah. The Providence Singers, perhaps the classiest vocal group around, did just that last night at Veterans Memorial Auditorium, with a fine-sounding New Haven Symphony backing them up.

The Singers probably would have never bothered with such a project had it not be for the fact that the New Haven players have been celebrating the genius of Mozart all this season, and were looking for a choral group to take on this 1780s recasting of a 1740s work.

For one thing, Mozart's rather bloated arrangement calling for four horns, flutes, trombones (even a bass one) and tuba, costs way more than Handel's sparingly scored original, with just a handful of strings, and a couple of oboes and trumpets.

What is most perculiar about Mozart's spin on this great baroque masterwork is the tendency to head off on orchestral tangents, letting the flutes and clarinets abandon the singers, rather than back them up. There were several places where Mozart couldn't resist the temptation to not just flesh out Handel's writing, but to add busy passagework that bordered on distracting.

More disappointing, though, was the absence of the high baroque trumpets that had gone out of fashion by the end of the 18th century. Instead of blazing solo in the aria "The Trumpet Shall Sound," Mozart, in a great anticlimactic gesture, gives most of the tune over to the lower-pitched horns.

At its core, though, the Mozart version is still Messiah in all its glory, still a dramatic retelling of the Bibical account of the life, death and resurrection of Jesus.

And with the Singer's Julian Wachner on the podium, it was a story told with great flair and drama, with brisk tempos and precious few pauses between arias and choruses.

This was especially true after intermission, when the Singers tore through a string of choral numbers at a blistering pace, proving that they are one very disciplined ensemble. Entrances were crisp, textures clear, and the overall sound buoyant and unforced.

The solo quartet, which in the Mozart rendition steals several choral sections, was somewhat spotty.

Aaron Engebreth, a light, nimble baritone, was fabulous in "Why Do The Nations Rage," one of the score's great showpieces. But tenor Noel Velasco had to scramble to get through "Thou Shalt Break Them."

Then Velasco, who was joined by his wife, mezzo Gigi Mitchell-Velasco, is more a grand opera sort of guy. His wife was at first hard to hear over the thicker Mozart orchestration, and she tended to sing everything in a clipped, somber fashion.

But soprano Jennifer Foster was a breath of fresh air, confident, stylish with a sweet top range that never failed her.

The Singers give a repeat performance in New Haven tomorrow night.

Sun, December 14, 2003

Messiah is in conductor Julian Wachner’s blood
The Providence Journal

An organist, conductor and prolific composer, Wachner is also something of a Messiah expert. He was even in the running a few years ago to take over Handel & Haydn, the last word when it comes to interpretations of Handel’s masterpiece.

He recalls taking part, as a prepubescent chorister at the famed St. Thomas Choir School in New York, in some of the first “authentic” re-creations of Messiah.

“It’s sort of in my blood,” he said of the music.

But a chance to do the Mozart Messiah is rare indeed. For one thing, it is costly to stage, with an orchestra twice the size of the typical Handel-period ensemble.

But it so happened the New Haven Symphony is celebrating the considerable genius of Wolfgang Amadeus this season, and they called on Wachner to lead the Austrian composer’s arrangement of Messiah.

As the orchestra went looking for a chorus, Wachner pushed his Providence Singers, with the idea of a cultural exchange. The New Haven players will be backing up the Singers Thursday at Vets. The Singers then head for New Haven for an encore performance two days later.

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Messiah is in conductor Julian Wachner's blood
Channing Gray
The Providence Journal, Sunday, December 14, 2003

 

So you've heard Messiah, the popular retelling of the life and times of Jesus that's sung by even the lowliest of choirs this time of year. It's as much a part of Christmas as mistletoe and credit-card debt.

What you might not know is that Handel's beloved oratorio comes in lots of packages.

When English conductor Sir Thomas Beecham made his landmark recording in the late 1950s, he used a scoring of Messiah calling for rippling harps, triangle and glockenspiel.

Jazz great Quincy Jones recorded a soul version, keeping Handel's text but adding saxes, string bass and swing aplenty. And there's a gospel arrangement out there called Too Hot To Handel.

It was not until about 1970, when the so-called early music craze took hold, that we began performing a Messiah that the composer might have recognized, one with modest choral forces and about 20 strings, oboes and trumpets.

Handel himself wrote somewhere between 15 and 18 versions, but those contain only minor differences, such as a soprano singing an alto aria.

"It's sort of like an archaelogical dig," said conductor Julian Wachner, who'll be leading his Providence Singers in Mozart's arrangement of Handel's work this Thursday. "Every century created its own version."

The Mozart Messiah, which was performed some years ago in Boston by the Handel & Haydn Society, is not quite so far out as Jones' upbeat reworking. But it is clearly a departure from the Messiah most audiences have come to know and love.

It was first performed in Vienna in 1789, 30 years after Handel's death, at the urging of Baron Gottfried Van Swieten, an ardent Handelian and patron of the arts.

Mozart went with the tastes and talents of his day, which meant a fuller orchestra with intruments that had come into the fore since Handel's time, trombones, clarinets and horn.

Also continuo, the practice of fleshing out the orchestral harmonies on a non-stop keyboard, had become a lost art.

When Handel composed the thrilling baritone aria The Trumpet Shall Sound, he created one of the great showpieces for high Baroque trumpet, or tromba. But by the late 1700s, this sort of music was all but unplayable for the trumpeters of the time.

So Mozart gives the part over to the lower-pitched French horn. Actually, the trumpet gets to play the first few notes, then when it is supposed to soar heavenward, it hands off to the horn, in a strange and awkward moment.

Mozart also has the soloists sing a lot of the music traditionally assigned to the chorus. Witness that in For Unto Us a Child is Given.

"The orchestral colors are the main difference," said Wachner. "It's like taking an old, classic black-and-white film and making it color."

String of Messiahs

Wachner, who has whipped the Providence Singers into a crack vocal ensemble in the past few years, was speaking from San Diego, where he is leading a string of traditional Messiahs this weekend with the San Diego Symphony.

Reached just after 8 in the morning at his posh downtown lodgings, Wachner was plowing through a breakfast of steak and eggs in his room with a view of the San Diego Zoo. Then it was off to 12 hours of rehearsal.

Wachner had been one of the more active composers and conductors in Boston when he took over the Singers. A couple of years ago, he cut all his ties to Boston and moved to Montreal to head up the choral program at McGill University.

He has an assistant to help with rehearsals. But still, he has been flying into Rhode Island a couple of times a month.

An organist, conductor and prolific composer, Wachner is also something of a Messiah expert. He was even in the running a few years ago to take over Handel & Haydn, the last word when it comes to interpretations of Handel's masterpiece.

He recalls taking part, as a prepubescent chorister at the famed St. Thomas Choir School in New York, in some of the first "authentic" re-creations of Messiah.

"It's sort of in my blood," he said of the music.

But a chance to do the Mozart Messiah is rare indeed. For one thing, it is costly to stage, with an orchestra twice the size of the typical Handel-period ensemble.

But it so happened the New Haven Symphony is celebrating the considerable genius of Wolfgang Amadeus this season, and they called on Wachner to lead the Austrian composer's arrangement of Messiah.

As the orchestra went looking for a chorus, Wachner pushed his Providence Singers, with the idea of a cultural exchange. The New Haven players will be backing up the Singers Thursday at Vets. The Singers then head for New Haven for an encore performance two days later.

Sticking to English

In Boston, Handel & Haydn sang Mozart's rendering in German, as Mozart intended. Handel, who spent much of his career in London, wrote in English, which Wachner is sticking with.

Sit through three hours of Handel and you want to know what the singers are saying, said Wachner.

"That's why Mozart wrote it in German. He wanted his audiences to understand it.

"This thing has to be in the vernacular."

The other thing listeners will notice about Wachner's interpretation is that he performs the work non-stop, without page-turning pauses between arias. This he said, gives it more the feel of a "dramatic opera."

Wachner figures that's one reason Mozart, who like Handel was the greatest opera composer of his day, was attracted to Messiah in the first place -- that it is, at its core, an astonishing piece of theater music.

As for the controversy as to whether to stand during the famed "Hallelujah Chorus," Wachner feels the issue has become just plain silly.

For a couple of centuries, audiences have lept to their feet as the first notes of the triumphant chorus sound. The story goes that when King George II of England first heard those regal chords, he was so moved he stood. The audience had no choice but to follow suit, a tradition that continues to this day.

But when English conductor Christopher Hogwood came to Boston to take over Handel & Haydn, he made something of a stink about standing, insisting it was disruptive and distracting at one of the most dramatic junctures in the score.

Wachner feels we've now become all too "neurotic" about the question.

"I love it," said Wachner, in favor of standing. "It's something our grandmothers taught us. I'm all for it. But it's gotten so only the peasants stand.

"Come on," he said -- the music world is missing the point. "You might say, 'Thank you for being here.' "

Julian Wachner leads the New Haven Symphony and the Providence Singers in Messiah Thursday at 7:30 p.m. at Veterans Memorial Auditorium, Avenue of the Arts, Providence. Tickets are $18 to $38. A Tufts University musicologist will discuss Mozart's arrangement of Handel's score at 6:45.

Mon, December 1, 2003

A Tale of Two Messiahs
MusicView

Handel’s Messiah offers similar universe- spanning opportunities. Not only is MacLeod featuring Mozart’s lush, infrequently heard late 18th-century orchestration of Handel’s earlier baroque masterpiece, but he’s also found the perfect conductor: Julian Wachner, the same man who composed the new pieces for The Planets.

And because Wachner, a specialist in choral and early music, founded the Providence Singers, both New Haven and Rhode Island audiences will hear the same singers and forces perform the work in the same month.

The Hollywood-born Wachner, 34, explains that Mozart created his version of Messiah for purely pragmatic reasons. By the time Mozart was born, three years before Handel died at age 74, performance practice had changed. Though Handel had expected continuo players to flesh out his music by improvising on organ and/or harpsichord, continuo playing had since become a lost art. Mozart therefore filled in Handel’s unwritten continuo parts with writing for winds…

“At times you think you’re hearing Mozart, and at other times you’re hearing Handel. It’s a very interesting juxtaposition.”

In keeping with Mozart’s period and intent, Wachner has chosen soloists gifted with the larger operatic sound Mozart would have preferred for performances of his operas. This achieves a more Italianate effect than do the lighter, early music British-type voices usually heard in Messiah. In fact, the conductor’s only deviation from Mozart’s intent, besides the use of modern instruments, is that New Haven’s Messiah is sung not in Mozart’s native language German, but in Handel’s original English.

“I view Messiah as one of the best pieces ever written,” says Wachner. “It’s hit tune after hit tune.

“Often they drag out the assistant conductor who sort of has to do it, and the performers sit there begrudgingly playing it. But I really fire it up. I try to catch the drama of the work and really get people’s souls stirring. It will be unlike any other Messiah.”

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A Tale of Two Messiahs
In New Haven, Mozart's homage to Handel's Christmas classic
Jason Victor Serinus
MusicView, December 2003

 

New Haven Symphony's managing director Michael MacLeod, has instituted a novel approach to programming in his two years here that is attracting larger audiences. Those who haven't yet had a chance to hear what MacLeod's is up to will get that chance on December 20, when the symphony performs Mozart's seldom-heard orchestration of Handel's Messiah.

When MacLeod came to New Haven two years ago, he discovered the fourth oldest symphony orchestra in the United States grappling with the same issues that affect classical music organizations around the world: changing listening preferences, a graying audience that is decreasing in size, an appalling lack of music education, and fewer opportunities for exposure to classical music.

"People no longer want to go to concerts and sit for two and a half hours listening to classical music in the way that they did 40 years ago," explains the former managing director of John Eliot Gardiner's famed authentic instrument Monteverdi Choir and Orchestra. "People are now into multi-tasking.

"Two examples. Forty years ago, when you watched the news you had Walter Cronkite reading a monologue, with occasional footage of something else going on. Now you've got a person on one quarter of the screen talking about one story. Underneath you've got a script running about a different story. You've got the weather forecast, stock reports, sports, etc. And you are able to absorb it. You also drive your car, probably drink coffee, and speak on the cell phone all at the same time."

To cater to this new consciousness, the New Haven Symphony has come up with imaginative and inventive programming that doesn't dumb down the musical experience. A case in point is the theme of this season's concerts, the marvelous musical universe of Mozart, and the part Messiah plays in it.

The first concert of the season paired Mozart's Jupiter Symphony with a performance of Holst's The Planets, complete with projected images of planets on the ceiling. Composer/conductor Julian Wachner was commissioned to write two new pieces that augmented Holst's popular score with tributes to Pluto and Planet X, the two planets that were discovered after Holst composed The Planets. Finally, thanks to a loan from Yale, the music concluded with optional viewing of the planets using the same telescope through which Halley's Comet was first seen. The evening drew the symphony's largest audience of the past two years.

Handel's Messiah offers similar universe- spanning opportunities. Not only is MacLeod featuring Mozart's lush, infrequently heard late 18th-century orchestration of Handel's earlier baroque masterpiece, but he's also found the perfect conductor: Julian Wachner, the same man who composed the new pieces for The Planets.

And because Wachner, a specialist in choral and early music, founded the Providence Singers, both New Haven and Rhode Island audiences will hear the same singers and forces perform the work in the same month.

The Hollywood-born Wachner, 34, explains that Mozart created his version of Messiah for purely pragmatic reasons. By the time Mozart was born, three years before Handel died at age 74, performance practice had changed. Though Handel had expected continuo players to flesh out his music by improvising on organ and/or harpsichord, continuo playing had since become a lost art. Mozart therefore filled in Handel's unwritten continuo parts with writing for winds.

In addition, by Mozart's time trumpeters had lost the ability to play the wonderful, clarion trumpet lines that characterize the music of Bach and Handel. "The embouchure of players had changed," Wachner explains. "In the baroque period the manner of playing high notes without valves was very well developed, but in Mozart's time trumpet players could only play lower in the range. So in Mozart's version of 'The Trumpet Shall Sound,' the trumpet plays the first four notes, after which the French horn takes over the job of playing on high."

Handel's scoring includes strings, two oboes, one bassoon, two trumpets, harpsichord and timpani. Mozart adds two flutes, one piccolo, two clarinets, different music for the bassoon, two French horns, and three trombones.

"Mozart created quite a rich color and sound world!" exclaims Wachner. "Some of the arias, such as 'The People that Walked in Darkness' that is scored for two clarinets and two bassoons, are just amazing. They sound very magical and quasi-mythological -- like they're from Mozart's opera The Magic Flute. Mozart was the first composer to use clarinets in an effective way, and he used them magically in his version of Messiah.

"Mozart creates an almost romantic, otherworldly take on what is sometimes considered stately. He also provides a more varied palette of color, with more emphasis on the orchestra than in Handel's version. It's as though you're hearing the voice of two composers.

"At times you think you're hearing Mozart, and at other times you're hearing Handel. It's a very interesting juxtaposition."

In keeping with Mozart's period and intent, Wachner has chosen soloists gifted with the larger operatic sound Mozart would have preferred for performances of his operas. This achieves a more Italianate effect than do the lighter, early music British-type voices usually heard in Messiah. In fact, the conductor's only deviation from Mozart's intent, besides the use of modern instruments, is that New Haven's Messiah is sung not in Mozart's native language German, but in Handel's original English.

"I view Messiah as one of the best pieces ever written," says Wachner. "It's hit tune after hit tune.

"Often they drag out the assistant conductor who sort of has to do it, and the performers sit there begrudgingly playing it. But I really fire it up. I try to catch the drama of the work and really get people's souls stirring. It will be unlike any other Messiah."

Sounds right on track for a symphony set to survive the 21st century. neophytes, as they applauded after each movement of Mozart’s Symphony No. 41, "Jupiter," which made up the first half of the program. This applause is like music to the marketing department at the NHSO.

The sound the orchestra made as it began Mozart’s allegro vivace came like a breeze through cedars — the stage made up mostly of strings and a scattering of flutes, oboes, bassoons, horns, trumpets and timpani. The first music was formal, then shifted to a slow aria, poignant, light, but nowhere sentimental. The minuet had a sexy meter, and the wonderful four-note fugue of the last movement was stunningly played, dazzling in its counterpoint. Mozart is pure genius.

After the interval came the heralded "The Planets" suite, Op. 32, by Gustav Holst. The lights in the hall dipped. The audience waited in darkness. The orchestra shone onstage like a painting in the Louvre. The five-note meter introduction of "Mars" — eerie, menacing — immediately spoke of the grandeur and precision of the NHSO sound this night.

And: There was a magic lantern show. Initially impressive but eventually distracting was the crimson and magenta wash of lights on the organ pipes, and Woolsey’s columns lit up in amber and gold. On the hall’s oculus, which is painted with the sky, an image of the planet Mars was projected, but the image was hurt by pollution from the other lights. Then, for clarification, the word "Mars." It was all very Martian.

"Venus," played lovingly by the orchestra, brought a change to greenish everywhere, and the addition of an ambient liquid gel projection, and then really big dancing bubbles projected on the organ — and so on. This was not an edgy laser-light show, although Saturn, projected, was most in focus. Classical music, especially heavily programmatic classical music, does not need to be dumbed down like this. At one point, two of the columns began flashing stroboscopically and with abandon, and giant orange searchlights blasting the balcony were painful to the eyes.

The orchestra’s "Mercury" movement was taken at an unusually effervescent tempo, that of Holst himself conducting a performance in 1926, Pak said. In "Jupiter," the "Roman hymn" trombone figure was especially delightful. And as Neptune drifted off with wordless singing offstage (by Yale’s Whim ‘n Rhythm), Pak blended in the world premiere of Julian Wachner’s tributes to "Planet X": "Pluto, God of the Underworld" and "Epilogue, the Sun."

The diminuendo women’s voices grew, the stage-right door opened, and trance-like they came in, dressed in black and carrying pyramids aglow like Star Trek phasers. This chorus sang a disturbing, atonal song-without-words reminiscent of a pagan rite, repetitive and limpid, up the aisles and out the back door.

"Pluto" was a tone poem, wistful and composed, but upstaged by two Casper the Friendly Ghost white balls threatening the symphony. The music of the "Sun" movement was strangely disconcerting, too, for its lack of optimism until the very end, the wonderful power of the organ almost upstaged by the disco lights. How can we hear new music for itself?

It must be said that the long program was awarded a standing ovation by an exhausted audience. The hoped-for viewing of the heavens in the Beinecke Library courtyard was canceled due to clouds. The Clark Telescope, the priceless Yale instrument used by Olmsted and Loomis in 1835, the first in North America to view the return of Halley’s comet, lay in state in the rotunda.

And The Associated Press reported on Sept. 9 that the Institute of Astronomy in Cambridge, England, has discovered that the voice of a black hole is a deep bass B flat, 57 octaves below middle C, far beyond the hearing range of humans.

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